Social work, poverty, and child welfare interventions (2022)

The relationship between children's material circumstances and child abuse and neglect raises a series of questions for policy, practice, and practitioners. Children and families in poverty are significantly more likely to be the subject of state intervention. This article, based on a unique mixed-methods study of social work interventions and the influence of poverty, highlights a narrative from practitioners that argues that, as many poor families do not harm their children, it is stigmatizing to discuss a link between poverty and child abuse and neglect. The data reveal that poverty has become invisible in practice, in part justified by avoiding stigma but also because of a lack of up-to-date research knowledge and investment by some social workers in an “underclass” discourse. We argue, in light of the evidence that poverty is a contributory factor in the risk of harm, that it is vital that social work engages with the evidence and in critical reflection about intervening in the context of poverty. We identify the need for fresh approaches to the harms children and families face in order to support practices that engage confidently with the consequences of poverty and deprivation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)364-372
Number of pages9
JournalChild and Family Social Work
Volume23
Issue number3
Early online date17 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018
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Morris, K., Mason, W., Bywaters, P., Featherstone, B., Daniel, B., Brady, G., Bunting, L., Hooper, J., Mirza, N., Scourfield, J., & Webb, C. (2018). Social work, poverty, and child welfare interventions. Child and Family Social Work, 23(3), 364-372. https://doi.org/10.1111/cfs.12423

Morris, Kate ; Mason, Will ; Bywaters, Paul ; Featherstone, Brid ; Daniel, Brigid ; Brady, Geraldine ; Bunting, Lisa ; Hooper, Jade ; Mirza, Nughmana ; Scourfield, Jonathan ; Webb, Calum. / Social work, poverty, and child welfare interventions. In: Child and Family Social Work. 2018 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 364-372.

(Video) What is social work? Children and families

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(Video) Easy Go-To Interventions for Social Workers {with ROLE PLAYS}

Morris, K, Mason, W, Bywaters, P, Featherstone, B, Daniel, B, Brady, G, Bunting, L, Hooper, J, Mirza, N, Scourfield, J & Webb, C 2018, 'Social work, poverty, and child welfare interventions', Child and Family Social Work, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 364-372. https://doi.org/10.1111/cfs.12423

Social work, poverty, and child welfare interventions. / Morris, Kate; Mason, Will; Bywaters, Paul; Featherstone, Brid; Daniel, Brigid; Brady, Geraldine; Bunting, Lisa; Hooper, Jade; Mirza, Nughmana; Scourfield, Jonathan; Webb, Calum.

In: Child and Family Social Work, Vol. 23, No. 3, 08.2018, p. 364-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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(Video) M-32. Role of social workers in working with families -Intervention skills

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(Video) Poverty and Child Welfare

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Morris K, Mason W, Bywaters P, Featherstone B, Daniel B, Brady G et al. Social work, poverty, and child welfare interventions. Child and Family Social Work. 2018 Aug;23(3):364-372. https://doi.org/10.1111/cfs.12423

FAQs

What role do social workers play in poverty? ›

Social workers help the poor by providing advocacy services, such as acting as mediators or directly intervening with social services organizations or governmental agencies. This is a key part of social work poverty and child welfare interventions.

What is an example of a social work intervention? ›

Social service interventions also may include concrete services such as income support or material aid, institutional placement, mental health services, in-home health services, supervision, education, transportation, housing, medical services, legal services, in-home assistance, socialization, nutrition, and child and ...

Why intervention is important in social work? ›

The purpose of the intervention is diverse and ranges from: increasing life skills or changing behaviour to increase life options. promoting independence and inter-dependence. working with conflicts of interest or in relationships.

What is meant by intervention in social work? ›

What Is Intervention in Social Work? Social work intervention is the engagement a social worker has with an individual, family, group, or community that they are helping. An intervention plan in social work will be formulated based on the client assessment to help ensure the best chance of success.

How do social workers solve social problems? ›

Social workers assist people by helping them cope with issues in their everyday lives, deal with their relationships, and solve personal and family problems. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were more than 715,000 social workers in the United States in 2020.

What are micro interventions in poverty? ›

Micro practice, as it relates to poverty, may include linking a client to unemployment resources, housing resources, assisting individuals in applying for welfare programs, and helping the individual cope with the hardships of living in poverty.

What are the 3 levels of social work intervention? ›

Currently, there are three widely recognized levels of social work practice: micro, mezzo (meso), and macro social work. Although these levels are often spoke of as if they are distinct, it is important to recognize that these 'different levels' occur in tandem and constantly influence the other levels.

What are the 5 social work processes? ›

The primary sections of the social casework process are study, assessment, intervention, termination, and evaluation. They are the process threads that will be weaved together during the social casework process.

What is the example of intervention? ›

An example of intervention is a group of friends confronting a friend about their drug use and asking the friend to seek treatment. An act that alters the course of a disease, injury, or condition by initiating a treatment or performing a procedure or surgery.

What are the different types of intervention? ›

In this Page
  • Cognitive–behavioural therapies.
  • Relationship-based interventions.
  • Systemic interventions.
  • Psychoeducational interventions.
  • Group work with children.
  • Psychotherapy/counselling.
  • Peer mentoring.
  • Intensive service provision.

What are intervention strategies? ›

Intervention strategies means a plan for staff action that outlines methods, techniques, cues, programs, or tasks that enable the child to successfully complete a specific goal.

How do social workers plan for intervention? ›

Planning and intervention is a core social work task. It requires a solid grasp of different social work methods and an awareness of feelings, emotional responses and patterns of interaction. Adult social care planning should be person-centred with clear goals, based upon an individual's needs and wishes.

What are the six methods of social work? ›

Social work has six methods of working with people (casework, group work, community organisation, social action, social welfare administration and social work research). These methods are the techniques of enabling the people for better social functioning.

What are the roles of social worker? ›

The job of a social worker

Identify individuals and groups in need of support. Assess the needs, circumstances, and support systems of clients. Work with clients to determine achievable, actionable goals and plans to meet them. Intervene in crisis situations involving abuse, mental health emergencies, or trauma.

How can you advocate for someone in poverty situation? ›

What can I do?
  1. Church Partnerships. Combining your church's heart for the poor and FH's global work, we can connect you to the best opportunity to get involved. ...
  2. Volunteering. Volunteering at FH events and tours all over the United States is an amazing way to advocate for the world's most vulnerable people. ...
  3. Prayer.

How does social class affect poverty? ›

Sociologists agree that social class, determined by education, income, and occupation levels, impacts families and shapes lives and opportunities. Poor families have fewer material resources and opportunities, and often live in neighborhoods and school districts that are less desirable.

Videos

1. Poverty and Social Work
(Swan social work)
2. Parenting Interventions in Child Welfare: Creating a Continuum of Care
(UW Video)
3. Child Welfare and Youth Homelessness Prevention in Canada
(Homeless Hub)
4. U of C Examines Connection Between Poverty and Child Welfare
(wttwchicago)
5. Social Work LIVE Episode 2: Elwin Wu and Intersectionality
(Columbia U School of Social Work)
6. Social Work and Child Welfare: Looking Back to Look Ahead
(UHD College of Public Service)

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